+level

 

differentiating levels



You might be looking through the class descriptions and thinking, How should I know what level of student I am?  That's a perfectly reasonable response, so that's why we decided to try to help make things a little easier by giving you some basic guidelines for judging which category your practice might belong.  

Remember that no matter what level you are on your mat, making this reference point is more about creating better opportunities to grow and learn so that you enjoy your practice more; it's not to be used as an opportunity to cast negative judgment on yourself.  Kino MacGregor says not to skip the struggle; yoga is a lifelong journey and meeting each milestone with gratitude and fortitude is important.  So don't be discouraged; taking this time to evaluate where you realistically stand is the first step to transformation.
 

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level 1

 

Those who are recovering from injury, lead a more sedentary lifestyle, are beginners to the technique of yoga in general, and/or don't have a regular exercise regimen would be considered a level 1 student.

Classes that will increase the yogi's ability on their yoga journey are as follows:

  • Gentle
  • Basics
  • Undo & Renew
  • Restorative
  • Yogis' Choice
  • Express
  • Gentle + Restore
  • Slow Flow

level 2


Those who already have a regular and frequent exercise regimen with a general, basic or advanced understanding of the foundational aspects of yoga might prefer these classes:

  • Vinyasa
  • Hot Yoga
  • Flow + Inversions
 
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It is through your body that you realize you are a spark of divinity.
— B.K.S. Iyengar
 
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Yoga begins right where I am – not where I was yesterday or where I long to be.
— Linda Sparrowe
 

Follow your nature. The practice is really about uncovering your own pose; we have great respect for our teachers, but unless we can uncover our own pose in the moment, it’s not practice — it’s mimicry. Rest deeply in Savasana every day. Always enter that pratyahara (withdrawn state) every day. And just enjoy yourself. For many years I mistook discipline as ambition. Now I believe it to be more about consistency. Do get on the mat. Practice and life are not that different.

- Judith Hanson Lasater

 
 

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It's important to note

-- No matter what class you decide to go to at the end (or beginning) of the day, all of the instructors are very helpful, informed, and accommodating and will offer modifications to help you continue to grow in your practice (whether you are a beginner or an advanced yogi).  These guidelines are offered to help you enjoy your visit at the studio, to offer you the best opportunities to become whatever yogi you've decided that you want to become at an honest, healthy and intelligent pace.

We want to support your growth and help you understand the dynamics of an asana practice so that you will inevitably enhance your well-being.